5 Best Tips for Assembling Your Guitar Body

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This is the 5 Best Tips for Assembling Your Acoustic Guitar Body. In this post, you’ll learn the tricks to assembling a well made guitar body easily.

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Assembling your Guitar Body

5-Best-Tips-for-Assembling-Your-Guitar-BodyOnce you have the top, back, and sides of your acoustic guitar already to go, it’s time to assemble them into a fully formed body. The following tips will help you make this process more successful, and it will also be a lot easier.

The big goal when assembling the body is to make sure that everything is air tight, and that your joinery between the plates and the sides meets at the right angle.

It does take a little bit of attention to make sure that your body is glued together properly, that it has the right shape, and that there are no air leaks.

However, if you follow these five tips coming up, you’ll have a much easier time.

See Also: Acoustic Guitar Making For Beginners

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Use a Body Mold

Of all the things you can possibly do when assembling your guitar body, using a body mold is one of the best decisions you could make. Whatever you do, try to resist the urge to do this process freehand without any assistance.

The body mold is a great alignment tool. It helps ensure that the relationship between the sides and the plates is correct, and that alone means a much better shaped body.

Even if you struggle while using the guitar mold, the odds of you having a body that comes out deformed or oddly shaped are very low. The mold does a lot of the work in orienting your pieces, and that’s the majority of the battle.

The rest of the battle is keeping them in their orientation while the glue dries, but the mold is also exceptional at doing that as well.

See Also: Using a Guitar Mold

Have All Your Supplies Ready

The next thing that’s important is to have all of your supplies ready. You would be surprised how many clamps it’s going to take to glue on each plate as you work your way around the guitar.

You might also be surprised when some of your clamps but don’t quite reach the places and you expect them to. This can turn into a pretty big problem, especially when your project is covered with glue.

It’s important that you have absolutely everything you’re going to need right at your fingertips without having to search around. When it really comes down to it, you will never be able to find what you need in a rush.

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Get out all of your clamps, your glue, your strap, and anything else that you are going to use to make this assembly a success. Then, test it all.

See Also: 1,001 Acoustic Guitar Making Tips for Beginners

Do a Dry Run First

This is the point of the exercise where you get to test all of that equipment and make sure that you really do have everything that you think you need. This is called a dry run, and I definitely don’t recommend skipping this tip.

A dry run is where you complete the entire assembly phase just as if you were doing the real thing. However, the only difference is that you don’t use any glue. The point is to flush out any deficiencies that may exist in your process.

For example, if you don’t have enough clamps, the dry run will show you. It will also show you if your clamps are the right size, your plates don’t fit well, or there is an alignment issue.

It may be a pain in the butt to have to fix those things, but at least your project isn’t covered with glue.

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See Also: Glue Covered Problems Are Harder to Fix

Address Any Fit Issues

The next step is about what you do with the information you receive from your dry run. The short answer is that you fix it.

If you didn’t have enough clamps, get more. If your plates didn’t come together nicely against your sides without any gaps, fix the areas that have gaps.

Work your way around the entire guitar just like this, fixing and addressing all of the problems that you encountered in your dry run. The point is to eliminate them now so that way you can glue your pieces together later without any interruptions.

See Also: 16 Awesome Reasons to Use Titebond Wood Glue

Use a Glue Roller and Work Quickly

Finally, this is a large assembly project, and you are going to be limited in the amount of time that you have to work with your pieces before the glue starts to set up.

Everything you can do in a situation like this to get your glue applied faster is a benefit, and it will give you more time to get everything aligned correctly before you apply your clamps.

I recommend the use of a small glue roller to apply the glue to the sides and kerfing of the guitar when you do your assembly. It will make the process a lot faster, it will be a lot more even, and you’ll have less of a chance that you apply too much.

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See Also: 25 Simple Ways to Customize Your Guitar Without Changing the Tone

Your Action Assignment

Now that you know how to assemble the body really well, and ensure that you have a good build, then it’s time to get out into the shop and take action. If you have been wanting to build an acoustic guitar for some time now, it’s a lot easier than you think.

Get yourself a couple good books on acoustic guitar making, and start reading them right away. You’ll be so excited after you see how easy the project looks that you’ll be buying wood and making tools before you know it.

If you have any questions on these five tips about assembling your acoustic guitar body, please post a question in the forum and I’ll be happy to answer it. Happy building.

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  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
Buy My Books on Amazon

I receive Commissions for Purchases Made Through the Links in This Post.

 

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