How to Find the Best Wood for Your Harry Potter Wand

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This is How to Find the Best wood for Your Harry Potter Wand. If you’re making your own wands, you need to have access to the best wood possible. In this post, I’ll show you several places to get it, as well how to find deals. Enjoy.

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Harry Potter Wand Wood

how-to-find-the-best-wood-for-your-harry-potter-wandPart of the lore of wand making is the type of wood that the wand is constructed from. Some believe that different types of wood have different magical properties, and that all becomes part of each wand’s story.

When you’re looking for different types of wood, especially as a beginner, there can be a really large information gap that keeps you away from some of the best species. This is mainly just because of being new, and not having been exposed to them yet.

I’ll show you several different resources here that will help expose you to more types of wood, and broaden your wand making ability. After that, you can continue your search and over time you will know a lot about the different types of wood available in the world.

This is a good wood list for making woodworking projects. It has to do with making rings, but the wood will work for wands too.

Finding Wood Online

The first and the easiest way to find wood for making wands is to go online. You’re already there, so all you need to do is take a look on Google or Amazon, and see what types of wood are available.

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The easiest thing to do first is actually to go to Google images, and search for handmade wooden wands. Take a look at all of the different varieties that are available, and when you find one that you like, you can investigate further to see what type of wood it’s made from.

Write down the names of any type of wood that you like, and save them for later. It’s important to build up a little bit of a wood database so that way you have something to work from. You can do this very quickly with an online search.

Once you find what you like, hop over to Amazon and see if you can pick something up very quickly that is large enough for you to make a wand. In most cases you can find something that will work, and you may even find something better.

See Also: 10 Fun Things to Build With Wood

Your Local Hardwood Store

Another really good place to look for wood when you’re making wands is your local hardwood store. Just about everywhere you go, there will be at least one store that’s dedicated to selling exotic wood to the general public.

You might have to call around a little bit, and ask a few questions, but that’s OK. A good place to start is a woodworking store, because they are going to get that question quite often. If there’s a wood dealer in the area, they will know about it.

When you go to the store for the first time, leave yourself at least a couple hours just to walk around and explore. If it’s your first time, it’s going to be magical. It’s also going to take a lot longer, which is why you need the extra time.

If you enjoy making wands by hand, or making them on the lathe, you are going to be overwhelmed by the different choices for wood that you’ll discover here. It’s amazing, and it can last you a lifetime.

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Once you find a nice looking piece, I show how to make a hand carved wand step by step in another post.

Fine Woodworking Stores

Another place to go, like I mentioned earlier is a fine woodworking store. Most of the stores specialize in carrying tools that you really can’t find in home-improvement stores. That’s why they exist, and they serve a very specific need.

A natural companion of fine woodworking tools is fine woodworking wood. For this reason, many of them carry a line of exotic wood that you can purchase right there. Depending on the location, some have bigger selections then others.

If you don’t have a hardwood store that’s close to you, odds are you probably do have a woodworking store. Go in, and just like the hardwood store, give yourself a couple hours to wander around if this is your first time.

Get yourself over to the wood section, and start taking a look at the different pieces that they offer. You’ll be very excited to see types of wood that you’ve probably never seen before, and to think about all the possibilities.

See Also: A Beginners Guide to Woodworking

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Bargain Wand Wood

Even in the wizarding world, there’s nothing wrong with a good deal. There isn’t a witch or wizard out there that will turn down a bargain. That being said, here’s how to find wood for wand making on a deal.

The first place to start is in the scrap bin of your local hardwood store. Most of these places mill wood to size, and they sell it to their customers. That means scraps fall on the floor, and they tend to go in a bin for a very low price.

Another thing that you can do for a bargain is to look at less expensive species of wood that still have a really good look. For example, Pine, Curly Maple, Aromatic Cedar, and Poplar can all have very interesting variations.

None of these types of wood are expensive, with the exception of curly maple in very rare cases where the look is just outstanding. Most of these pieces of wood will be separated from the bargain area anyway. So don’t worry about it.

One of the interesting things about Poplar is that you can find it with streaks of black, purple, green, and tan. You can really make an interesting wand for a very low price. Also, Tennessee Cedar, or Aromatic Cedar is beautiful just as it is.

All of these types of wood make excellent wands, and you’ll get a lot more beauty than you would expect for the price you paid for the material. The material also works really well, and takes a finish nicely.

See Also: 23 Easy Ways to Age Wood and Make Wood Look Old

High End Wand Making Wood

With any type of hobby, there is a high-end. This is for the folks who really don’t care about price, or interestingly enough, people that are making small projects. If you’re making something small, you don’t need a lot of wood, which means the price can still be low.

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This is the type of wood that you’ll find in a hardwood store or a woodworking store. You can also find it online, and there are lots of specialty sellers that deal and one-of-a-kind pieces that you can buy for your wands.

A few good examples that are a little bit more expensive but are very beautiful include:

  • Bocote
  • East Indian Rosewood
  • Wenge
  • Bubinga
  • Padauk

Each of these are extraordinarily beautiful in their own right, and when you make them into a wand, you will be very pleased with the results.

If you want to make your wands look more period/authentic, take a read through my post on making wood like like it was reclaimed. These techniques will apply to making your wand wood look more aged and authentic right from the start.

Laminated Blanks

The next step after using a solid piece of wood to make your wand is to use a piece of laminated wood. This is simply several pieces of wood in different colors and looks that you glue together to form one blank.

If you’re looking to take your wand making to the next level, this is definitely the way to do it. Not only do you get the amazing properties of wood, you also get several different species, and several different colors all mixed together.

You can use this to your advantage, then design a blank that creates a perfect looking wand that is exactly what you want. Also, once you glue the pieces together, the wand making process is the same afterward. It’s just as if the piece was just one species.

See Also: Woodworking Tips Cards – Laminated Wood

Turning vs Carving

Depending on how you’re making your wand, you do want to consider the density of the wood as you make your decision. In general, carving the wand by hand is going to take a bit more effort, whereas turning a wand on the lathe will require less.

For this reason, it’s a good idea to choose types of wood that are a little bit softer if you’re going to hand carve a wand. The pieces don’t have to be like butter, but you definitely don’t want to be carving a piece of Ironwood.

When you working on the lathe, you have a little bit easier choice. It really doesn’t matter how hard or how soft the species is, it’ll just take a little bit longer for the tool to cut. Since the tool is doing the work, just pick out what you like.

I made this wand on a lathe for a costume, and I still have it in my tool bag to this day just in case I run into a problem that my other tools cannot solve.

If You Like My Posts, You'll Love My Books

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Wand Wood Selection Tips

Making a wooden wand is a lot of fun, and even if you’re not making them for yourself, I’m sure you know a lucky young kid that would definitely have fun with a brand new wand. Here are a few more tips to get you through the process:

  • Choose a design that is classic, and start your wand making adventure there. You can always branch out in the future.
  • If you really fall in love with wand making, consider buying a lathe. It will be an initial investment of course, but it will definitely reward you with a lot of happiness, and a lot of wands.
  • It’s better to choose wood that is plain sawn than something that’s fully finished, and it will be cheaper for that reason.
  • Study the common sizes of wands before you make anything, because they’re actually a little smaller than you might think.
  • No matter what type of wood that you use, execute your design very well, and put a lot of pride into your work.

See Also: The Last 10% Principle for Woodworking

Your Action Assignment

Now that you know several different places to get wood for making wands, it’s time to get out into the shop and take action. Use this information, and start your search online to find different examples of great types of wood.

Once you find several that you like, take a look on Amazon and see if there’s an easy way to pick some up. When you get it into your shop, experiment with the wood, and see if you like how it looks.

From there, schedule yourself a few hours to spend time in a hardwood store or a woodworking store that has a good selection of wood. In there, you will find several different types of wood that can inspire you.

If you have any questions on Finding Wood to Make a Harry Potter Wand, please post a question and I’ll be glad to answer them. Happy building.

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  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
Buy My Books on Amazon

I receive Commissions for Purchases Made Through the Links in This Post.

 

You Can Find My Books on Amazon!

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