How to Fix a Wobbly Table

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This is How to Fix a Wobbly Table. In this post, I’ll show you several different ways that you can fix a wobbly table, and you’ll finally be able to eat dinner without the table moving around anymore. Enjoy.

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How to Fix a Wobbly Table

How-to-Fix-a-Wobbly-TableThere is nothing more annoying than trying to sit down and have dinner and your table keeps flopping around and moving because it’s not level. A wobbly table can be very annoying, and it can lead to spilled drinks and swearwords.

In reality, the leveling process is actually pretty easy. If you have a wobbly table, there’s absolutely no reason why you should have to suffer through the problem. Instead, just use one of these super easy methods to fix it, and you’ll be all set.

All of these range in scope from super easy to a little bit more involved. Pick one that you are comfortable with, and in no time you should be able to take the wobble right out of your table and knock this project off your list.

If you’ve made a table and it wobbles, you should never settle for that. 

See Also: 13 Helpful Tips on How to Stain a Wood Table

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Move the Table Around a Little

One of the first things that you should look at, and easily the quickest solution is the type of surface that the table sits on. Most tables that wobble around are sitting on tile or wood flooring, and that’s really where the problem begins.

Most tile and wood floors are not perfectly flat. They look flat, and they feel flat, but if you were to break out a long enough straight edge you would see that it’s not the case. This is more likely than not the reason why your table wobbles.

It’s ok though, because you can use that to your advantage. You may only be a few inches away from four spots that are actually co-planar, and that would take out your movement.

If the space permits, move the table a few inches in every direction and see if the wobble goes away. If it does, it’s because you found four spots on the floor that are all at the same level, and if you can leave your table there, you don’t have to worry about it moving around anymore.

That doesn’t solve the problem, take a look at some of the solutions coming up for addressing what might be an issue with the legs of the table.

See Also: How to Make Hollow Table Legs

Add a Felt Pad to the Short Leg

If you can rock your table back-and-forth, take a look underneath as you do it, and you’ll notice that two of the legs are longer than the others. These two legs are going to be diagonal from each other, and by shaking the table a little you should be able to find them quickly.

Once you identify the two long legs, through process of elimination you can then identify the two short legs. These are the ones you need to attack in order to fix the wobble, and the first step to fixing the problem is pretty easy.

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The first thing you need to get is a pack of felt pads. You can find these in home-improvement stores, and they are specifically meant to be used under the legs and feet of furniture that are placed on hardwood and tile floors.

If the wobble that you have is very minor, you can use one or two felt pads on each one of the short legs, and that will make them each a pinch taller. Typically this is all you need to make them the same height as the other legs, getting rid of your wobble.

See Also: 2 Best Table Top Finishes You Can Buy

Add a Leveler to the Short Leg

If the felt pads are not quite big enough, buy a pack of chair levelers, which look like thick plastic discs with a nail coming out of the middle. These are meant to be nailed to the bottom of chair legs and table legs, and they add substantially more length than felt pads.

Again, the process first starts with you identifying which two legs are the tall ones, and then switching to the two legs that are the short ones. You can likely put one of these levelers on one of the short legs, and it can tip the table enough that it becomes level.

You may even end up using one of these levelers on one side and a felt pad on the other to get it perfect. There’s no penalty for combining methods. As long as the wobble goes away, you’re doing it right.

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See Also: 12 Helpful Tips for Joining Planks for a Table Top

Cut Down the Long Leg

Here comes the nuclear option, and this is for tables where the wobble is so significant that you really can’t do anything else to make it go away. Sometimes, you are just going to have to remove one of the legs and cut off some of the length.

This starts again by identifying the taller legs, but this time you need to remove one of them and take off some of the end. I recommend starting with a quarter-inch, and making additional cuts from there if necessary.

If the other two methods didn’t level your table, those leveler feet are about a quarter inch thick, so starting thin is really the best way to make sure you don’t overshoot your cut and end up with a table that is way too short.

See Also: The Last 10% Principle for Woodworking

Put the Table on a Thick Carpet

Interestingly, a little trick that you can do if you don’t mind changing what the floor looks like is to simply add a nice rug underneath your table. In most cases where the wobble is not really significant, this will make it go away.

Make sure that you buy a rug that is large enough where all four legs of the table touch the surface of the carpet. A good carpet or rug that is not super thin will have enough cushion to absorb the slight difference in the table legs.

If you buy a super cheap carpet that’s more like a bedsheet, you’re wasting your time. Thicker carpets will make this work while thinner carpets will not. Keep that in mind as you’re shopping, because you don’t want to have a wobbly table that just has a carpet under it now.

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Your Action Assignment

Now that you know all of these different ways to fix a wobbly table, it’s time to get out into the shop and take action. If you’ve got a table that you need to fix, and your woodworking project didn’t come out exactly how you thought, don’t let your family eat on a wobbly table and think that you are a poor woodworker.

Instead, start with some felt pads and see if you can eliminate the wobble like that. If it wasn’t super big to begin with, odds are that a couple of felt pads will do the trick, and for the price of a few dollars and a trip to the home-improvement store you’ll be all done.

If you have any questions about these different ways to fix a table that’s not level on your floor, please post a question and I’ll be glad to answer them. Happy building.

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  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
Buy My Books on Amazon

I receive Commissions for Purchases Made Through the Links in This Post.

 

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