The Secret to Buying Pipe Clamps from Home Depot

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This is The Secret to Buying Pipe Clamps from Home Depot. In this post, you’ll learn how to get a full set of pipe clamps from Home Depot on a single trip.

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Home Depot Pipe Clamps

The-Secret-to-Buying-Pipe-Clamps-from-Home-DepotPipe clamps are a really nice thing to have in your woodworking shop. They make clamping large objects really easy, and they are just so useful in so many ways.

If you’ve ever had to make a bench top, or a table top, having pipe clamps can help you get everything ready for gluing, and they can even help you with alignment. Again, if you don’t have a set of pipe clamps, they are too cheap not to have them.

The only problem you’re going to run into is putting them together, because when you buy a set of these clamps, there are no pipes. You need to buy, cut, and thread those pipes, and then you can install the hardware to make your completed clamp.

However, if you use this little trick while you’re at Home Depot, you’ll be able to walk out of the door with completed pipe clamps instead of parts. I’ll show you everything you need to know.

See Also: 6 Huge Tips for Buying Woodworking Clamps

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Buy the Pipe Clamp Kit

The first thing you need to pick up are your pipe clamp kits. These are sold in the tool area next to the other clamps. It’s a small blister pack, and it has the two ends of the clamp inside.

If you’re going to buy several of these, it’s a good idea just to get them all done at once. The process that comes next is fairly quick, so even if they have to run several pipes through it, it will still be fast enough.

Get as many kits as you need, or you can even order them online. You may save a few dollars if you pick them up on Amazon instead of buying them inside of a store.

See Also: 9 Great Tips for Storing Wood Clamps

Get Your Pipe Next

The next thing you need is your pipe. You want a thicker walled pipe, and definitely not anything that looks like it’s for electrical. Thin conduit is basically useless, so don’t think you’re saving any money.

Look on the package, and it’ll tell you exactly what size and diameter pipes you need, and what the recommended thread setting is. Pick up whatever pipe is the most economical, and you can have it cut down to length in the next step.

Again, it’s not about getting the exact length that you need right now, it’s about buying whatever’s the most economical, because you can cut it down later.

See Also: How To Make Cam Clamps

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Have Them Thread the Pipe for You

One of the interesting things about Home Depot is that they will thread pipe for you. All you have to do is go talk to someone in the plumbing section and they will take care of it.

You bring them your pipes, your kits, and tell them the information about the length of the pipes and the threads that need to be cut.

Well they will not assemble the kits for you, they can cut and thread the pipes to your desired length so that way when you go home you can assemble your kits into fully completed pipe clamps.

See Also: 50 Awesome Reasons to be a Woodworker

Walk Out With Complete Clamps

Now, you’re going to be walking out the door with pipes that are ready to have the kits installed, and corresponding kits with the hardware, you’re basically walking out the door with completed clamps at this point, all you need to do is put them together.

There is one little thing though that you need to do before you put your pipe clamps together, and this is very important.

If You Like My Posts, You'll Love My Books

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When those pipes were cut and threaded at Home Depot, they use oil as a lubricant. This means that oil is now all over the pipes, inside, and outside. You need to remove that because oil and wood definitely do not mix.

When you get a oil on a piece of wood, it absorbs inside just like an oil finish. Now you’re going to have all kinds of problems when it comes to applying your actual finish, because it won’t like to stick.

It will also cause problems if you try to sand it out, because oil will penetrate so deeply that you may have to sand off a lot more than you are willing to lose. Instead of going through all of that, just use some solvent and clean off all the oil.

This can take a little bit of time, but keep on working until your clamps are no longer greasy. You’ll thank me later.

See Also: 29 Ways to Maximize Your Woodworking Shop Layout

Assemble Your Clamps

Now that all of your pipes are nice and clean, follow the directions on your pipe clamp hardware and put your clamps together. This is a really straightforward process, and you can usually do each clamp in a couple of minutes.

You basically end up screwing one of the pieces onto the threaded end, and then the other just slides up and down the pipe.

Put all of your clamps together, and test them out to make sure that they work OK. The odds of you getting a defective hardware kit are very low, but you want to identify that long before you actually need the clamps.

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See Also: How to be a Modern Renaissance Woodworker

Your Action Assignment

Now that you know all about making pipe clamps at Home Depot, it’s time to get out into your shop and take action. Rather, it’s time to go to Home Depot and get yourself some huge clamps.

Big clamps are awesome to have in the shop. You may not use them very often, but the times that you do, they are super helpful. Also, making pipe clamps is a far more economical means of getting big clamps into your shop than buying them pre-made.

The next time you have to glue up something large, don’t worry about how you’re going to do it. Simply pull out your pipe clamps, and you’ll have everything you need for a successful project.

If you have any questions about pipe clamps and getting your hardware from Home Depot, please post a question and I’ll be glad to answer it. Happy building.

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  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
Buy My Books on Amazon

I receive Commissions for Purchases Made Through the Links in This Post.

 

You Can Find My Books on Amazon!

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