My Wooden Wedding Ring

  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
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I knew for a long time that I wanted a wooden wedding ring. I also knew that it needed to stand up to a lifetime of use. Wood by itself is not that durable. If you take care of a wooden piece very well, it can last a long time. However, a wedding ring is not something that is safe all the time. It can get wet, snag on things, and become scratched. This is a preview of my solution to having a wooden wedding ring that I could wear forever.

Making My Wedding Ring

wooden wedding ringI explain the process for making my wedding ring in another article, this is what it looked like in the beginning. I decided to epoxy a titanium band inside a piece of wood. This solved the strength problem instantly. The only thing I had left was the moisture problem.

Briar has long been a favorite among tobacco pipe makers. This wood is great at getting wet and drying out over and over again. For this reason, and because Briar is gorgeous, I chose the wood for the the outside of the ring.

My wooden wedding ring was made on the lathe. This is entirely optional. Most people who will be reading this won’t have a lathe, and will be working the project by hand. Do not worry. Making a ring by hand is not harder, it just takes longer.

Look around online for a ring that has a flat outside profile. Buy one in your size, and then epoxy a piece of wood around it. After the epoxy dries, you can shape the wood to a thin ring around the metal. Once shaped, it can then be stained, or finished in the natural color.

Briar makes an excellent ring, and if you contrast stain the piece it will look amazing. I have been wearing my wooden wedding ring for years now, and it still looks as nice as the day I made it. From the picture above, the ring did not start out looking like very much. However, once it was turned and finished, it came out nicely. You can see the finished product here.

You can make a wooden ring from almost any species. I chose Briar because I really like to work with the wood, and it stains well. If you have a particular love for a certain species, you can just as easily use it.

When you put a metal band inside the ring, you are creating a structure that will support the wood for a long time. Some woods will wear better than others, but if you care for your ring, you can get a lifetime of use from it.

If you have questions about My Wooden Wedding Ring, please leave a comment and I will be glad to answer them. Also, please Subscribe so you don’t miss out on anything new happening on the site. Happy building.

 

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  • More than 20 Years Woodworking Experience
  • 7 Woodworking Books Available on Amazon
  • Over 1 Million Words Published About Woodworking
  • Bachelor of Arts Degree from Arizona State University
Buy My Books on Amazon

I receive Commissions for Purchases Made Through the Links in This Post. Join My Woodworking Facebook Group

 

You Can Find My Books on Amazon!

woodworking and guitar making books
 

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